by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update, June 12, 2020

Welcome

Happy Friday, June 12th – can you believe we are almost ½ way through June already!  We hope this posting finds you looking forward to a stellar weekend.  We wrap the Health and Wellness series on days, months, time and seasons with time zones.  Due the global nature of our business, time zones pay a critical part in coordination of our efforts.

Please enjoy your weekend, be safe and remember no new postings on the weekend.  We will be back on Monday and we hope to see you virtually then.  Thank you for your continued interest not only in the postings but also in Hatch Stamping Company!    In addition, if you have not reached out to your Human Resources profession with current contact information please do so.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Health and Wellness

Life isn’t about getting and having, it’s about giving and being. –Kevin Kruse

Why do we need Time Zones

Map of zones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone#/media/File:World_Time_Zones_Map.png

When well-regulated mechanical clocks became widespread in the early 19th century, each city began to use local mean solar time. Apparent and mean solar time can differ by up to around 15 minutes (as described by the equation of time) because of the elliptical shape of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun (eccentricity) and the tilt of the Earth’s axis (obliquity). Mean solar time has days of equal length, and the accumulated difference between the two sums to zero after a year.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675, when the Royal Observatory was built, as an aid to mariners to determine longitude at sea, providing a standard reference time while each city in England kept a different local time.

Local solar time became increasingly inconvenient as rail transport and telecommunications improved, because clocks differed between places by amounts corresponding to the differences in their geographical longitudes, which varied by four minutes of time for every degree of longitude. For example, Bristol, England is about 2.5 degrees west of Greenwich (East London), so when it is solar noon in Bristol, it is about 10 minutes past solar noon in London.

The first adoption of a standard time was in November 1840, in Great Britain by railway companies using GMT kept by portable chronometers. The first of these companies to adopt standard time was the Great Western Railway (GWR) in November 1840. This quickly became known as Railway Time. About August 23, 1852, time signals were first transmitted by telegraph from the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Even though 98% of Great Britain’s public clocks were using GMT by 1855, it was not made Britain’s legal time until August 2, 1880. Some British clocks from this period have two minute hands—one for the local time, one for GMT.

Sir Sandford Fleming proposed a worldwide system of time zones in 1879. He advocated his system at several international conferences, and is credited with “the initial effort that led to the adoption of the present time meridians”. In 1876, his first proposal was for a global 24-hour clock, conceptually located at the centre of the Earth and not linked to any surface meridian. His system was proposed at the International Meridian Conference in October 1884, but it did not adopt his time zones because they were not within its purview. The conference did adopt a universal day of 24 hours beginning at Greenwich midnight.

By about 1900, almost all inhabited places on Earth had adopted one or other standard time zone; but only some of these used an hourly offset from GMT. Many applied the time at a local astronomical observatory to an entire country, without any reference to GMT. It took many decades before all time zones were based on some “standard offset” from GMT/UTC. By 1929, most major countries had adopted hourly time zones.

Today, all nations use standard time zones for secular purposes, but they do not all apply the concept as originally conceived. Newfoundland, India, Iran, Afghanistan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Marquesas, as well as parts of Australia use half-hour deviations from standard time, and some nations, such as Nepal, and some provinces, such as the Chatham Islands of New Zealand, use quarter-hour deviations. Some countries, such as China and India, use a single time zone even though the extent of their territory far exceeds 15° of longitude.

 

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update, June 12, 2020

Welcome

Happy Friday, June 12th – can you believe we are almost ½ way through June already!  We hope this posting finds you looking forward to a stellar weekend.  We wrap the Health and Wellness series on days, months, time and seasons with time zones.  Due the global nature of our business, time zones pay a critical part in coordination of our efforts.

Please enjoy your weekend, be safe and remember no new postings on the weekend.  We will be back on Monday and we hope to see you virtually then.  Thank you for your continued interest not only in the postings but also in Hatch Stamping Company!    In addition, if you have not reached out to your Human Resources profession with current contact information please do so.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Health and Wellness

Life isn’t about getting and having, it’s about giving and being. –Kevin Kruse

Why do we need Time Zones

Map of zones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone#/media/File:World_Time_Zones_Map.png

When well-regulated mechanical clocks became widespread in the early 19th century, each city began to use local mean solar time. Apparent and mean solar time can differ by up to around 15 minutes (as described by the equation of time) because of the elliptical shape of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun (eccentricity) and the tilt of the Earth’s axis (obliquity). Mean solar time has days of equal length, and the accumulated difference between the two sums to zero after a year.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675, when the Royal Observatory was built, as an aid to mariners to determine longitude at sea, providing a standard reference time while each city in England kept a different local time.

Local solar time became increasingly inconvenient as rail transport and telecommunications improved, because clocks differed between places by amounts corresponding to the differences in their geographical longitudes, which varied by four minutes of time for every degree of longitude. For example, Bristol, England is about 2.5 degrees west of Greenwich (East London), so when it is solar noon in Bristol, it is about 10 minutes past solar noon in London.

The first adoption of a standard time was in November 1840, in Great Britain by railway companies using GMT kept by portable chronometers. The first of these companies to adopt standard time was the Great Western Railway (GWR) in November 1840. This quickly became known as Railway Time. About August 23, 1852, time signals were first transmitted by telegraph from the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Even though 98% of Great Britain’s public clocks were using GMT by 1855, it was not made Britain’s legal time until August 2, 1880. Some British clocks from this period have two minute hands—one for the local time, one for GMT.

Sir Sandford Fleming proposed a worldwide system of time zones in 1879. He advocated his system at several international conferences, and is credited with “the initial effort that led to the adoption of the present time meridians”. In 1876, his first proposal was for a global 24-hour clock, conceptually located at the centre of the Earth and not linked to any surface meridian. His system was proposed at the International Meridian Conference in October 1884, but it did not adopt his time zones because they were not within its purview. The conference did adopt a universal day of 24 hours beginning at Greenwich midnight.

By about 1900, almost all inhabited places on Earth had adopted one or other standard time zone; but only some of these used an hourly offset from GMT. Many applied the time at a local astronomical observatory to an entire country, without any reference to GMT. It took many decades before all time zones were based on some “standard offset” from GMT/UTC. By 1929, most major countries had adopted hourly time zones.

Today, all nations use standard time zones for secular purposes, but they do not all apply the concept as originally conceived. Newfoundland, India, Iran, Afghanistan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Marquesas, as well as parts of Australia use half-hour deviations from standard time, and some nations, such as Nepal, and some provinces, such as the Chatham Islands of New Zealand, use quarter-hour deviations. Some countries, such as China and India, use a single time zone even though the extent of their territory far exceeds 15° of longitude.

 

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update, June 12, 2020

Welcome

Happy Friday, June 12th – can you believe we are almost ½ way through June already!  We hope this posting finds you looking forward to a stellar weekend.  We wrap the Health and Wellness series on days, months, time and seasons with time zones.  Due the global nature of our business, time zones pay a critical part in coordination of our efforts.

Please enjoy your weekend, be safe and remember no new postings on the weekend.  We will be back on Monday and we hope to see you virtually then.  Thank you for your continued interest not only in the postings but also in Hatch Stamping Company!    In addition, if you have not reached out to your Human Resources profession with current contact information please do so.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Health and Wellness

Life isn’t about getting and having, it’s about giving and being. –Kevin Kruse

Why do we need Time Zones

Map of zones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone#/media/File:World_Time_Zones_Map.png

When well-regulated mechanical clocks became widespread in the early 19th century, each city began to use local mean solar time. Apparent and mean solar time can differ by up to around 15 minutes (as described by the equation of time) because of the elliptical shape of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun (eccentricity) and the tilt of the Earth’s axis (obliquity). Mean solar time has days of equal length, and the accumulated difference between the two sums to zero after a year.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675, when the Royal Observatory was built, as an aid to mariners to determine longitude at sea, providing a standard reference time while each city in England kept a different local time.

Local solar time became increasingly inconvenient as rail transport and telecommunications improved, because clocks differed between places by amounts corresponding to the differences in their geographical longitudes, which varied by four minutes of time for every degree of longitude. For example, Bristol, England is about 2.5 degrees west of Greenwich (East London), so when it is solar noon in Bristol, it is about 10 minutes past solar noon in London.

The first adoption of a standard time was in November 1840, in Great Britain by railway companies using GMT kept by portable chronometers. The first of these companies to adopt standard time was the Great Western Railway (GWR) in November 1840. This quickly became known as Railway Time. About August 23, 1852, time signals were first transmitted by telegraph from the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Even though 98% of Great Britain’s public clocks were using GMT by 1855, it was not made Britain’s legal time until August 2, 1880. Some British clocks from this period have two minute hands—one for the local time, one for GMT.

Sir Sandford Fleming proposed a worldwide system of time zones in 1879. He advocated his system at several international conferences, and is credited with “the initial effort that led to the adoption of the present time meridians”. In 1876, his first proposal was for a global 24-hour clock, conceptually located at the centre of the Earth and not linked to any surface meridian. His system was proposed at the International Meridian Conference in October 1884, but it did not adopt his time zones because they were not within its purview. The conference did adopt a universal day of 24 hours beginning at Greenwich midnight.

By about 1900, almost all inhabited places on Earth had adopted one or other standard time zone; but only some of these used an hourly offset from GMT. Many applied the time at a local astronomical observatory to an entire country, without any reference to GMT. It took many decades before all time zones were based on some “standard offset” from GMT/UTC. By 1929, most major countries had adopted hourly time zones.

Today, all nations use standard time zones for secular purposes, but they do not all apply the concept as originally conceived. Newfoundland, India, Iran, Afghanistan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Marquesas, as well as parts of Australia use half-hour deviations from standard time, and some nations, such as Nepal, and some provinces, such as the Chatham Islands of New Zealand, use quarter-hour deviations. Some countries, such as China and India, use a single time zone even though the extent of their territory far exceeds 15° of longitude.

 

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update, June 12, 2020

Welcome

Happy Friday, June 12th – can you believe we are almost ½ way through June already!  We hope this posting finds you looking forward to a stellar weekend.  We wrap the Health and Wellness series on days, months, time and seasons with time zones.  Due the global nature of our business, time zones pay a critical part in coordination of our efforts.

Please enjoy your weekend, be safe and remember no new postings on the weekend.  We will be back on Monday and we hope to see you virtually then.  Thank you for your continued interest not only in the postings but also in Hatch Stamping Company!    In addition, if you have not reached out to your Human Resources profession with current contact information please do so.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Health and Wellness

Life isn’t about getting and having, it’s about giving and being. –Kevin Kruse

Why do we need Time Zones

Map of zones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone#/media/File:World_Time_Zones_Map.png

When well-regulated mechanical clocks became widespread in the early 19th century, each city began to use local mean solar time. Apparent and mean solar time can differ by up to around 15 minutes (as described by the equation of time) because of the elliptical shape of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun (eccentricity) and the tilt of the Earth’s axis (obliquity). Mean solar time has days of equal length, and the accumulated difference between the two sums to zero after a year.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675, when the Royal Observatory was built, as an aid to mariners to determine longitude at sea, providing a standard reference time while each city in England kept a different local time.

Local solar time became increasingly inconvenient as rail transport and telecommunications improved, because clocks differed between places by amounts corresponding to the differences in their geographical longitudes, which varied by four minutes of time for every degree of longitude. For example, Bristol, England is about 2.5 degrees west of Greenwich (East London), so when it is solar noon in Bristol, it is about 10 minutes past solar noon in London.

The first adoption of a standard time was in November 1840, in Great Britain by railway companies using GMT kept by portable chronometers. The first of these companies to adopt standard time was the Great Western Railway (GWR) in November 1840. This quickly became known as Railway Time. About August 23, 1852, time signals were first transmitted by telegraph from the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Even though 98% of Great Britain’s public clocks were using GMT by 1855, it was not made Britain’s legal time until August 2, 1880. Some British clocks from this period have two minute hands—one for the local time, one for GMT.

Sir Sandford Fleming proposed a worldwide system of time zones in 1879. He advocated his system at several international conferences, and is credited with “the initial effort that led to the adoption of the present time meridians”. In 1876, his first proposal was for a global 24-hour clock, conceptually located at the centre of the Earth and not linked to any surface meridian. His system was proposed at the International Meridian Conference in October 1884, but it did not adopt his time zones because they were not within its purview. The conference did adopt a universal day of 24 hours beginning at Greenwich midnight.

By about 1900, almost all inhabited places on Earth had adopted one or other standard time zone; but only some of these used an hourly offset from GMT. Many applied the time at a local astronomical observatory to an entire country, without any reference to GMT. It took many decades before all time zones were based on some “standard offset” from GMT/UTC. By 1929, most major countries had adopted hourly time zones.

Today, all nations use standard time zones for secular purposes, but they do not all apply the concept as originally conceived. Newfoundland, India, Iran, Afghanistan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Marquesas, as well as parts of Australia use half-hour deviations from standard time, and some nations, such as Nepal, and some provinces, such as the Chatham Islands of New Zealand, use quarter-hour deviations. Some countries, such as China and India, use a single time zone even though the extent of their territory far exceeds 15° of longitude.

 

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 11, 2020

Welcome

Today is June 11, 2020.  We hope this posting finds you enjoying a beautiful end of Spring season.  Check out today’s Health and Wellness posting on seasons.

We are very proud of how our team is continuing to stay engaged remotely and thankful for your loyalty.  Please continue to stay tuned and stay safe!

Currently, there are no confirmed cases of the corona virus at Hatch Stamping.

Health and Wellness

Embrace the current season of your life. — Gabrielle Blair

Why do we have 4 Seasons

Some assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. That’s logical, but not the case for Earth. Instead, Earth has seasons because our planet’s axis of rotation is tilted at an angle of 23.5 degrees relative to our orbital plane – the plane of Earth’s orbit around the sun.

Over the course of a year, the angle of tilt does not vary. In other words, Earth’s northern axis is always pointing the same direction in space. At this time, that direction is more or less toward the star we call Polaris, the North Star. But the orientation of Earth’s tilt with respect to the sun – our source of light and warmth – does change as we orbit the sun. In other words, the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun for half of the year and away from the sun for the other half. The same is true of the Southern Hemisphere.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun, that region of Earth warms because of the corresponding increase in solar radiation. The sun’s rays are striking that part of Earth at a more direct angle. It’s summer.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented away from the sun, the sun’s rays are less direct, and that part of Earth cools. It’s winter.

Seasons in the Southern Hemisphere occur at opposite times of the year from those in the Northern Hemisphere. Northern summer = southern winter.

Our seasons change due to our planet’s angle of tilt – 23.5 degrees – relative to our orbit around the sun. If Earth did not tilt at all, but instead orbited exactly upright with respect to our orbit around the sun, there would be minor variations in temperature throughout each year as Earth moved slightly closer to the sun and then slightly farther away. In addition, there would be temperature differences from Earth’s equatorial region to the poles. However, without Earth’s tilt, we’d lack Earth’s wonderful seasonal changes and our association of them with the various times of year – associating a fresh feeling in the air with springtime, for example.

Bottom line: It is logical to assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. Nevertheless, Earth’s distance from the sun doesn’t change enough to cause seasonal differences. Instead, our seasons change because Earth tilts on its axis, and the angle of tilt causes the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to trade places throughout the year in receiving the sun’s light and warmth most directly.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 11, 2020

Welcome

Today is June 11, 2020.  We hope this posting finds you enjoying a beautiful end of Spring season.  Check out today’s Health and Wellness posting on seasons.

We are very proud of how our team is continuing to stay engaged remotely and thankful for your loyalty.  Please continue to stay tuned and stay safe!

Currently, there are no confirmed cases of the corona virus at Hatch Stamping.

Health and Wellness

Embrace the current season of your life. — Gabrielle Blair

Why do we have 4 Seasons

Some assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. That’s logical, but not the case for Earth. Instead, Earth has seasons because our planet’s axis of rotation is tilted at an angle of 23.5 degrees relative to our orbital plane – the plane of Earth’s orbit around the sun.

Over the course of a year, the angle of tilt does not vary. In other words, Earth’s northern axis is always pointing the same direction in space. At this time, that direction is more or less toward the star we call Polaris, the North Star. But the orientation of Earth’s tilt with respect to the sun – our source of light and warmth – does change as we orbit the sun. In other words, the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun for half of the year and away from the sun for the other half. The same is true of the Southern Hemisphere.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun, that region of Earth warms because of the corresponding increase in solar radiation. The sun’s rays are striking that part of Earth at a more direct angle. It’s summer.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented away from the sun, the sun’s rays are less direct, and that part of Earth cools. It’s winter.

Seasons in the Southern Hemisphere occur at opposite times of the year from those in the Northern Hemisphere. Northern summer = southern winter.

Our seasons change due to our planet’s angle of tilt – 23.5 degrees – relative to our orbit around the sun. If Earth did not tilt at all, but instead orbited exactly upright with respect to our orbit around the sun, there would be minor variations in temperature throughout each year as Earth moved slightly closer to the sun and then slightly farther away. In addition, there would be temperature differences from Earth’s equatorial region to the poles. However, without Earth’s tilt, we’d lack Earth’s wonderful seasonal changes and our association of them with the various times of year – associating a fresh feeling in the air with springtime, for example.

Bottom line: It is logical to assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. Nevertheless, Earth’s distance from the sun doesn’t change enough to cause seasonal differences. Instead, our seasons change because Earth tilts on its axis, and the angle of tilt causes the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to trade places throughout the year in receiving the sun’s light and warmth most directly.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 11, 2020

Welcome

Today is June 11, 2020.  We hope this posting finds you enjoying a beautiful end of Spring season.  Check out today’s Health and Wellness posting on seasons.

We are very proud of how our team is continuing to stay engaged remotely and thankful for your loyalty.  Please continue to stay tuned and stay safe!

Currently, there are no confirmed cases of the corona virus at Hatch Stamping.

Health and Wellness

Embrace the current season of your life. — Gabrielle Blair

Why do we have 4 Seasons

Some assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. That’s logical, but not the case for Earth. Instead, Earth has seasons because our planet’s axis of rotation is tilted at an angle of 23.5 degrees relative to our orbital plane – the plane of Earth’s orbit around the sun.

Over the course of a year, the angle of tilt does not vary. In other words, Earth’s northern axis is always pointing the same direction in space. At this time, that direction is more or less toward the star we call Polaris, the North Star. But the orientation of Earth’s tilt with respect to the sun – our source of light and warmth – does change as we orbit the sun. In other words, the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun for half of the year and away from the sun for the other half. The same is true of the Southern Hemisphere.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun, that region of Earth warms because of the corresponding increase in solar radiation. The sun’s rays are striking that part of Earth at a more direct angle. It’s summer.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented away from the sun, the sun’s rays are less direct, and that part of Earth cools. It’s winter.

Seasons in the Southern Hemisphere occur at opposite times of the year from those in the Northern Hemisphere. Northern summer = southern winter.

Our seasons change due to our planet’s angle of tilt – 23.5 degrees – relative to our orbit around the sun. If Earth did not tilt at all, but instead orbited exactly upright with respect to our orbit around the sun, there would be minor variations in temperature throughout each year as Earth moved slightly closer to the sun and then slightly farther away. In addition, there would be temperature differences from Earth’s equatorial region to the poles. However, without Earth’s tilt, we’d lack Earth’s wonderful seasonal changes and our association of them with the various times of year – associating a fresh feeling in the air with springtime, for example.

Bottom line: It is logical to assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. Nevertheless, Earth’s distance from the sun doesn’t change enough to cause seasonal differences. Instead, our seasons change because Earth tilts on its axis, and the angle of tilt causes the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to trade places throughout the year in receiving the sun’s light and warmth most directly.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 11, 2020

Welcome

Today is June 11, 2020.  We hope this posting finds you enjoying a beautiful end of Spring season.  Check out today’s Health and Wellness posting on seasons.

We are very proud of how our team is continuing to stay engaged remotely and thankful for your loyalty.  Please continue to stay tuned and stay safe!

Currently, there are no confirmed cases of the corona virus at Hatch Stamping.

Health and Wellness

Embrace the current season of your life. — Gabrielle Blair

Why do we have 4 Seasons

Some assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. That’s logical, but not the case for Earth. Instead, Earth has seasons because our planet’s axis of rotation is tilted at an angle of 23.5 degrees relative to our orbital plane – the plane of Earth’s orbit around the sun.

Over the course of a year, the angle of tilt does not vary. In other words, Earth’s northern axis is always pointing the same direction in space. At this time, that direction is more or less toward the star we call Polaris, the North Star. But the orientation of Earth’s tilt with respect to the sun – our source of light and warmth – does change as we orbit the sun. In other words, the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun for half of the year and away from the sun for the other half. The same is true of the Southern Hemisphere.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun, that region of Earth warms because of the corresponding increase in solar radiation. The sun’s rays are striking that part of Earth at a more direct angle. It’s summer.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented away from the sun, the sun’s rays are less direct, and that part of Earth cools. It’s winter.

Seasons in the Southern Hemisphere occur at opposite times of the year from those in the Northern Hemisphere. Northern summer = southern winter.

Our seasons change due to our planet’s angle of tilt – 23.5 degrees – relative to our orbit around the sun. If Earth did not tilt at all, but instead orbited exactly upright with respect to our orbit around the sun, there would be minor variations in temperature throughout each year as Earth moved slightly closer to the sun and then slightly farther away. In addition, there would be temperature differences from Earth’s equatorial region to the poles. However, without Earth’s tilt, we’d lack Earth’s wonderful seasonal changes and our association of them with the various times of year – associating a fresh feeling in the air with springtime, for example.

Bottom line: It is logical to assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. Nevertheless, Earth’s distance from the sun doesn’t change enough to cause seasonal differences. Instead, our seasons change because Earth tilts on its axis, and the angle of tilt causes the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to trade places throughout the year in receiving the sun’s light and warmth most directly.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 10, 2020

Welcome

Greetings! Today is Wednesday, June 10, 2020!

We hope this posting finds you well and excited to learn more about time!  Remember that research shows knowing random information/facts lead to overall health!

We are so appreciative that you are taking time to check in virtually and appreciate your commitment to the team!  Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Please be safe, stay connected and stay tuned!

Health and Wellness

Change your thoughts and you change your world. –Norman Vincent Peale

Why Do We have Daylight Savings Time?

What Is Daylight Saving Time?

DST is a seasonal time change measure where clocks are set ahead of standard time during part of the year, usually by one hour. As DST starts, the Sun rises and sets later, on the clock, than the day before.

Today, about 40% of countries worldwide use it to make better use of daylight and to conserve energy.

While Germany and Austria were the first countries to use DST in 1916, it is a little-known fact that a few hundred Canadians beat the German Empire by eight years. On July 1, 1908, the residents of Port Arthur, Ontario, today’s Thunder Bay, turned their clocks forward by one hour to start the world’s first DST period.

Other locations in Canada soon followed suit. On April 23, 1914, Regina in Saskatchewan implemented DST. The cities of Winnipeg and Brandon in Manitoba did so on April 24, 1916. According to the April 3, 1916, edition of the Manitoba Free Press, Daylight Saving Time in Regina “proved so popular that bylaw now brings it into effect automatically.”

However, the idea did not catch on globally until Germany introduced DST in 1916. Clocks in the German Empire, and its ally Austria, were turned ahead by one hour on April 30, 1916—2 years into World War I. The rationale was to minimize the use of artificial lighting to save fuel for the war effort.

Within a few weeks, the idea was followed by the United Kingdom, France, and many other countries. Most of them reverted to standard time after World War I, and it wasn’t until the next World War that DST made its return in most of Europe.

Although modern DST has only been used for about 100 years, ancient civilizations are known to have engaged in comparable practices thousands of years ago. For example, the Roman water clocks used different scales for different months of the year to adjust the daily schedules to the solar time.

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 10, 2020

Welcome

Greetings! Today is Wednesday, June 10, 2020!

We hope this posting finds you well and excited to learn more about time!  Remember that research shows knowing random information/facts lead to overall health!

We are so appreciative that you are taking time to check in virtually and appreciate your commitment to the team!  Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Please be safe, stay connected and stay tuned!

Health and Wellness

Change your thoughts and you change your world. –Norman Vincent Peale

Why Do We have Daylight Savings Time?

What Is Daylight Saving Time?

DST is a seasonal time change measure where clocks are set ahead of standard time during part of the year, usually by one hour. As DST starts, the Sun rises and sets later, on the clock, than the day before.

Today, about 40% of countries worldwide use it to make better use of daylight and to conserve energy.

While Germany and Austria were the first countries to use DST in 1916, it is a little-known fact that a few hundred Canadians beat the German Empire by eight years. On July 1, 1908, the residents of Port Arthur, Ontario, today’s Thunder Bay, turned their clocks forward by one hour to start the world’s first DST period.

Other locations in Canada soon followed suit. On April 23, 1914, Regina in Saskatchewan implemented DST. The cities of Winnipeg and Brandon in Manitoba did so on April 24, 1916. According to the April 3, 1916, edition of the Manitoba Free Press, Daylight Saving Time in Regina “proved so popular that bylaw now brings it into effect automatically.”

However, the idea did not catch on globally until Germany introduced DST in 1916. Clocks in the German Empire, and its ally Austria, were turned ahead by one hour on April 30, 1916—2 years into World War I. The rationale was to minimize the use of artificial lighting to save fuel for the war effort.

Within a few weeks, the idea was followed by the United Kingdom, France, and many other countries. Most of them reverted to standard time after World War I, and it wasn’t until the next World War that DST made its return in most of Europe.

Although modern DST has only been used for about 100 years, ancient civilizations are known to have engaged in comparable practices thousands of years ago. For example, the Roman water clocks used different scales for different months of the year to adjust the daily schedules to the solar time.