by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update June 16, 2020

Welcome

Welcome to Tuesday, June 16th.  We continue our exploration of how monuments are built.  Remember to take a break each day to learn something new!

We have no new updates at this time from Customers to share, most are still working on their ramp ups in a very scheduled pace.  We are working to support them.  Please make sure Human Resources has your contact information.

Thank you for checking in with us virtually, we are very appreciative of your loyalty and interest!

Be Safe!

Hatch Stamping currently has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Health and Wellness

Determine that the thing can and shall be done and then… find the way.― Abraham Lincoln

The Lincoln Memorial is an American national memorial built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. Taking the form of a neoclassical temple, the memorial’s architect was Henry Bacon. The designer of the memorial interior’s large central statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French; the Lincoln statue was carved by the Piccirilli Brothers.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address and his second inaugural address.

The Memorial is anchored in a concrete foundation, 44 to 66 feet (13 to 20 m) in depth, constructed by M. F. Comer and Company and the National Foundation and Engineering Company, and is encompassed by a 187-by-257-foot (57 by 78 m) rectangular granite retaining wall measuring 14 feet (4.3 m) in height.

The Memorial’s interior is divided into three chambers by two rows of four Ionic columns, each 50 feet (15 m) tall and 5.5 feet (1.7 m) across at their base. The central chamber, housing the statue of Lincoln, is 60 feet wide, 74 feet deep, and 60 feet high.

Lying between the north and south chambers of the open-air Memorial is the central hall, which contains the large solitary figure of Abraham Lincoln sitting in contemplation. Its sculptor, Daniel Chester French, supervised the Piccirilli Brothers in its construction, and it took four years to complete.

The 175 short tons (159 t) statue, carved from Georgia white marble, was shipped in 28 pieces. Originally intended to be only 10 feet (3.0 m) tall, the sculpture was enlarged to 19 feet (5.8 m) from head to foot considering it would look small within the extensive interior space.  If Lincoln were depicted standing he would be 28 feet (8.5 m) tall.

The widest span of the statue corresponds to its height, and it rests upon an oblong pedestal of Tennessee marble 10 feet (3.0 m) high, 16 feet (4.9 m) wide, and 17 feet (5.2 m) deep. Directly beneath this lies a platform of Tennessee marble about 34.5 feet (10.5 m) long, 28 feet (8.5 m) wide, and 6.5 inches (0.17 m) high. Lincoln’s arms rest on representations of Roman fasces, a subtle touch that associates the statue with the Augustan (and imperial) theme (obelisk and funerary monuments) of the Washington Mall. The statue is discretely bordered by two pilasters, one on each side. Between these pilasters, and above Lincoln’s head, is engraved an epitaph of Lincoln  by Royal Cortissoz.

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update June 15, 2020

Welcome

Welcome to Monday, June 15, 2020

We hope this posting finds you well and that you were able to enjoy the weekend.  Thank you for your virtual visit.  Today, we are exploring, exploring the background of the Statue of Liberty.  We hope you like learning about how it was assembled; we thought the engineers and manufacturers in all of us would like to know more.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.  Please know we are thinking of all team members.  We hope your families, friends, communities and colleagues as well as our team members remain safe and well.

Stay tuned!

Health and Wellness

The New Colossus

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”   Emma Lazarus

The Statue of Liberty is located on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York, in the United States.  Americans are extremely proud of the Lady Liberty, as the statue is often referred to, it is recognized as a universal symbol of freedom and democracy.

Most of us know that France gifted the Statue of Liberty to the United States, but have you ever wondered how the great statue was assembled?

French poet and college administrator Édouard de Laboulaye proposed the idea for a monument to the United States in 1865 for the passing of the 13th Amendment, the abolition of slavery. Ten years later, in 1875, he turned to his friend French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi to design this monument to freedom and justice for all.

For years, Bartholdi worked out of the Gaget, Gauthier & Co. workshop in Paris, creating the statue in pieces not simply because the project was so large.

He fashioned the neoclassical statue out of a beautiful copper that would glint in the sunlight. Not only was the bright pinkish-orange metal eye-catching, it was malleable, which made it relatively easy for the artist to mold, yet durable and resistant to corrosion, which made it a coveted material in architecture and statues.

On a trip to the U.S., Bartholdi had found the perfect spot for the statue: Bedloe’s Island, a government-owned property that’s part of the island of Manhattan yet surrounded by the waters of New Jersey.

The following year, Laboulaye passed away, without ever getting to see his vision realized. Finally, in June 1884, the statue was complete. With a 98-foot interior framework, she stood 151 feet tall.

It would have been impossible for the Statue of Liberty to travel at that magnificent stature, so she was disassembled into parts, just like she had been created in parts. She was broken down, limb by limb, into 350 disparate parts. Each pieces weighed anywhere from 150 pounds to 4 tons.

The pieces of the statue were each given a number or figure so that those with identical figures could later be matched according to how they fit together.  The many parts of the statue were then boxed up into 214 crates made of wood. On the ship, they weathered the choppy waters of the Atlantic for 27 days.

In 1885, at last, the full statue arrived in the U.S. — but there was nowhere to put her.

Although the statue was a gift from France, the U.S. had to provide a suitable pedestal for her, and so poet Emma Lazarus was pressured to contribute a raffle item to the Bartholdi Pedestal Fund Art Loan Exhibition to help raise funds. In two days, she wrote “The New Colossus,” the sonnet that we’ve all come to associate with the Statue of Liberty (the poem wasn’t affixed to the statue as a bronze plaque until 1903). In 1883, the Americans laid the foundation on Bedloe’s Island, and in 1884, they planted the first stone for the pedestal, and then they ran out of money. Newspaper tycoon Joseph Pulitzer raises $50,000 within two months to fund the pedestal, but it still wasn’t until the following year that it was completed.

The time came to unveil the Bartholdi’s creation. First, her skeleton was raised. Then it came time to put on her “skin.” Despite being carefully packaged, the disassembled statue came out with some warping. Workers in the U.S. refashioned the pliable metal so the pieces fit correctly.  They lined the shiny pieces up by corresponding figures, finding that the edges of the pieces featured tiny holes so that when a corresponding piece was matched, the holes lined up. Then, they riveted them together.

They fastened Bartholdim’s copper plates around Eiffel’s iron bars. A layer of asbestos and shellac provided a cushion between the two metals to hinder any chemical reactions, namely galvanic corrosion, that may occur.

Four months later, the Statue of Liberty was finally erected in New York City, shining like a beacon of hope for freedom and justice.

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update, June 12, 2020

Welcome

Happy Friday, June 12th – can you believe we are almost ½ way through June already!  We hope this posting finds you looking forward to a stellar weekend.  We wrap the Health and Wellness series on days, months, time and seasons with time zones.  Due the global nature of our business, time zones pay a critical part in coordination of our efforts.

Please enjoy your weekend, be safe and remember no new postings on the weekend.  We will be back on Monday and we hope to see you virtually then.  Thank you for your continued interest not only in the postings but also in Hatch Stamping Company!    In addition, if you have not reached out to your Human Resources profession with current contact information please do so.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Health and Wellness

Life isn’t about getting and having, it’s about giving and being. –Kevin Kruse

Why do we need Time Zones

Map of zones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone#/media/File:World_Time_Zones_Map.png

When well-regulated mechanical clocks became widespread in the early 19th century, each city began to use local mean solar time. Apparent and mean solar time can differ by up to around 15 minutes (as described by the equation of time) because of the elliptical shape of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun (eccentricity) and the tilt of the Earth’s axis (obliquity). Mean solar time has days of equal length, and the accumulated difference between the two sums to zero after a year.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675, when the Royal Observatory was built, as an aid to mariners to determine longitude at sea, providing a standard reference time while each city in England kept a different local time.

Local solar time became increasingly inconvenient as rail transport and telecommunications improved, because clocks differed between places by amounts corresponding to the differences in their geographical longitudes, which varied by four minutes of time for every degree of longitude. For example, Bristol, England is about 2.5 degrees west of Greenwich (East London), so when it is solar noon in Bristol, it is about 10 minutes past solar noon in London.

The first adoption of a standard time was in November 1840, in Great Britain by railway companies using GMT kept by portable chronometers. The first of these companies to adopt standard time was the Great Western Railway (GWR) in November 1840. This quickly became known as Railway Time. About August 23, 1852, time signals were first transmitted by telegraph from the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Even though 98% of Great Britain’s public clocks were using GMT by 1855, it was not made Britain’s legal time until August 2, 1880. Some British clocks from this period have two minute hands—one for the local time, one for GMT.

Sir Sandford Fleming proposed a worldwide system of time zones in 1879. He advocated his system at several international conferences, and is credited with “the initial effort that led to the adoption of the present time meridians”. In 1876, his first proposal was for a global 24-hour clock, conceptually located at the centre of the Earth and not linked to any surface meridian. His system was proposed at the International Meridian Conference in October 1884, but it did not adopt his time zones because they were not within its purview. The conference did adopt a universal day of 24 hours beginning at Greenwich midnight.

By about 1900, almost all inhabited places on Earth had adopted one or other standard time zone; but only some of these used an hourly offset from GMT. Many applied the time at a local astronomical observatory to an entire country, without any reference to GMT. It took many decades before all time zones were based on some “standard offset” from GMT/UTC. By 1929, most major countries had adopted hourly time zones.

Today, all nations use standard time zones for secular purposes, but they do not all apply the concept as originally conceived. Newfoundland, India, Iran, Afghanistan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Marquesas, as well as parts of Australia use half-hour deviations from standard time, and some nations, such as Nepal, and some provinces, such as the Chatham Islands of New Zealand, use quarter-hour deviations. Some countries, such as China and India, use a single time zone even though the extent of their territory far exceeds 15° of longitude.

 

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 11, 2020

Welcome

Today is June 11, 2020.  We hope this posting finds you enjoying a beautiful end of Spring season.  Check out today’s Health and Wellness posting on seasons.

We are very proud of how our team is continuing to stay engaged remotely and thankful for your loyalty.  Please continue to stay tuned and stay safe!

Currently, there are no confirmed cases of the corona virus at Hatch Stamping.

Health and Wellness

Embrace the current season of your life. — Gabrielle Blair

Why do we have 4 Seasons

Some assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. That’s logical, but not the case for Earth. Instead, Earth has seasons because our planet’s axis of rotation is tilted at an angle of 23.5 degrees relative to our orbital plane – the plane of Earth’s orbit around the sun.

Over the course of a year, the angle of tilt does not vary. In other words, Earth’s northern axis is always pointing the same direction in space. At this time, that direction is more or less toward the star we call Polaris, the North Star. But the orientation of Earth’s tilt with respect to the sun – our source of light and warmth – does change as we orbit the sun. In other words, the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun for half of the year and away from the sun for the other half. The same is true of the Southern Hemisphere.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented toward the sun, that region of Earth warms because of the corresponding increase in solar radiation. The sun’s rays are striking that part of Earth at a more direct angle. It’s summer.

When the Northern Hemisphere is oriented away from the sun, the sun’s rays are less direct, and that part of Earth cools. It’s winter.

Seasons in the Southern Hemisphere occur at opposite times of the year from those in the Northern Hemisphere. Northern summer = southern winter.

Our seasons change due to our planet’s angle of tilt – 23.5 degrees – relative to our orbit around the sun. If Earth did not tilt at all, but instead orbited exactly upright with respect to our orbit around the sun, there would be minor variations in temperature throughout each year as Earth moved slightly closer to the sun and then slightly farther away. In addition, there would be temperature differences from Earth’s equatorial region to the poles. However, without Earth’s tilt, we’d lack Earth’s wonderful seasonal changes and our association of them with the various times of year – associating a fresh feeling in the air with springtime, for example.

Bottom line: It is logical to assume our planet’s changing distance from the sun causes the change in the seasons. Nevertheless, Earth’s distance from the sun doesn’t change enough to cause seasonal differences. Instead, our seasons change because Earth tilts on its axis, and the angle of tilt causes the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to trade places throughout the year in receiving the sun’s light and warmth most directly.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 10, 2020

Welcome

Greetings! Today is Wednesday, June 10, 2020!

We hope this posting finds you well and excited to learn more about time!  Remember that research shows knowing random information/facts lead to overall health!

We are so appreciative that you are taking time to check in virtually and appreciate your commitment to the team!  Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Please be safe, stay connected and stay tuned!

Health and Wellness

Change your thoughts and you change your world. –Norman Vincent Peale

Why Do We have Daylight Savings Time?

What Is Daylight Saving Time?

DST is a seasonal time change measure where clocks are set ahead of standard time during part of the year, usually by one hour. As DST starts, the Sun rises and sets later, on the clock, than the day before.

Today, about 40% of countries worldwide use it to make better use of daylight and to conserve energy.

While Germany and Austria were the first countries to use DST in 1916, it is a little-known fact that a few hundred Canadians beat the German Empire by eight years. On July 1, 1908, the residents of Port Arthur, Ontario, today’s Thunder Bay, turned their clocks forward by one hour to start the world’s first DST period.

Other locations in Canada soon followed suit. On April 23, 1914, Regina in Saskatchewan implemented DST. The cities of Winnipeg and Brandon in Manitoba did so on April 24, 1916. According to the April 3, 1916, edition of the Manitoba Free Press, Daylight Saving Time in Regina “proved so popular that bylaw now brings it into effect automatically.”

However, the idea did not catch on globally until Germany introduced DST in 1916. Clocks in the German Empire, and its ally Austria, were turned ahead by one hour on April 30, 1916—2 years into World War I. The rationale was to minimize the use of artificial lighting to save fuel for the war effort.

Within a few weeks, the idea was followed by the United Kingdom, France, and many other countries. Most of them reverted to standard time after World War I, and it wasn’t until the next World War that DST made its return in most of Europe.

Although modern DST has only been used for about 100 years, ancient civilizations are known to have engaged in comparable practices thousands of years ago. For example, the Roman water clocks used different scales for different months of the year to adjust the daily schedules to the solar time.

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 9, 2020!

Welcome

Thank you for visiting us on Tuesday, June 9th!

We hope this posting finds you well.  Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.  We continue to require screening to enter the buildings, we are limiting visitors and working to ensure all practices are being adhered to as we continue to work with our Customers on their ramp up timing. The Customers  have not communicated any updates at this time.

Please continue to visit us virtually, check out the Health and Wellness section – and today’s quote! We miss having the team together, but we continue to move in the right direction for a safe return to work!

Health and Wellness

Do what you can, where you are, with what you have. –Teddy Roosevelt

Why do we have 12 months in a year?

Julius Caesar first introduced the 12-month calendar, as we know it today, in the year 45 BC, on 1st January.

The calendar used previously consisted of only 10 months. It couldn’t account for the cyclic revolution of the earth around the sun, which takes exactly 365.2422 days.  The calendar, began the year in March and ended it in December.

The 10 month calendar was later modified because it accounted for only 304 days in a year.  The second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius added two months at the end of the calendar, Ianuarius and Februarius, to account for the missing days. He also introduced an intercalary month that occurred after Februarius in certain years. These years became known as leap years. In addition, he deleted one day from all the months that had 30 days, so that they had 29 days instead.

This resulted in a total of 355 days in a common year and 377 days in a leap year. The leap years were declared at the whim of the king. Although unstable, the calendar was in use for 700 years.

It became very confusing because seasons and calendars did not match. It played havoc with the farmers.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update, June 8, 2020

Welcome

Welcome Back! Today is Monday, June 8th.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company currently has no reported corona virus cases.  We hope you, your families and communities remain safe.  Thank you for visiting us virtually, since it is a Monday we thought it would be fun to look at why are there 7 days a week?  Check out today’s Health and Wellness post!

Health and Wellness

Challenges are what make life interesting and overcoming them is what makes life meaningful. –Joshua J. Marine

Why do we have 7 days in a week?

Historians believe it probably got its start with the ancient Babylonians.  Some experts believe the ancient Babylonians may have adopted a seven-day week to approximate the individual cycles of the Moon throughout the month. These cycles, however, only imperfectly line up with a seven-day week, requiring an extra day or two to be added to one week every few months.

 

Why did the ancient Babylonians settle on a seven-day week then? Some experts believe it’s because the ancient Babylonians believed the number seven had a mystical significance to it. This belief may have stemmed from their focus on the seven heavenly bodies they knew of at that time: the Sun, Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn.

 

The development of the seven-day week in other cultures can be traced to the creation story in the Bible. According to the Book of Genesis, God created everything in the world in six days and then rested the seventh day. Many believe this provided a model for early cultures to follow: work six days and rest on the seventh day.

 

Our modern calendars still adhere to the seven-day week. Many calendars and cultures around the world still observe Sunday as the first day of the week. Practically, however, with the modern five-day work week and two-day weekend, many people informally consider Monday to be the first day of the week and Sunday the last.

Note to Hatch Stamping Team Members

We continue to work with our customers, suppliers related to ramp up at each location, plant management and Human Resources make all contact relative to return to work.

Currently, entry into any location is based on permission again from plant management and/or Human Resources.  Please to not arrive without their knowledge.    Per our earlier posts, if they do not have your current contact information please make sure you get it to them.

Hatch Stamping Company continues to focus on the need for social distancing and personal hygiene.  Please be safe and stay connected.  Talk to you tomorrow (virtually that is!)

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update, June 5, 2020

Welcome

Happy Friday, June 5, 2020!

Thank you for visiting virtually!  Remember that there will be no postings Saturday and Sunday.  We hope you have a safe and spectacular weekend.  Please remember that social distancing and hygiene practices remain relevant to you, your family, communities and colleagues.

Currently, there are no reported cases of the corona virus at Hatch Stamping Company.

Please check back Monday!

Health and Wellness

As you ramble on through life, whatever be your goal keep your eye on the donut and not on the hole.~Anonymous

 

National Donut Day

A doughnut or donut (the latter spelling often seen in American English) is a type of fried dough confection or dessert food. The doughnut is popular in many countries and is prepared in various forms as a sweet snack that can be homemade or purchased in bakeries, supermarkets, food stalls, and franchised specialty vendors.

Doughnuts are usually deep fried from a flour dough, and typically either ring-shaped or a number of shapes without a hole, and often filled, but can also be ball-shaped (“doughnut holes”). Other types of batters can also be used, and various toppings and flavorings are used for different types, such as sugar, chocolate, or maple glazing.

The two most common types are the ring doughnut and the filled doughnut, which is injected with fruit preserves, cream, custard, or other sweet fillings. Once fried, doughnuts may be glazed with a sugar icing, spread with icing or chocolate on top, or topped with powdered sugar, cinnamon, sprinkles or fruit.  Doughnut varieties are divided into cake (including the old-fashioned) and yeast-risen type doughnuts.

The earliest origins to the modern doughnuts are generally traced back to the olykoek (“oil(y) cake”) Dutch settlers brought with them to early New York (or New Amsterdam). These doughnuts closely resembled later ones but did not yet have their current ring shape.

Hanson Gregory, an American, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 aboard a lime-trading ship when he was 16 years old. Gregory was dissatisfied with the greasiness of doughnuts twisted into various shapes and with the raw center of regular doughnuts. He claimed to have punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship’s tin pepper box, and to have later taught the technique to his mother.

Enjoy a doughnut today!

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update June 4, 2020

Welcome

It’s Thursday, June 4, welcome back to the employee website.  Hope you are all doing well, staying safe, and having “some” fun 🙂   Tomorrow, June 5, is National Doughnut Day in the United States, don’t forget to pick up a doughnut (or two).  In today’s Health and Wellness segment we are looking at bicycles.

We have no reported cases of corona virus at Hatch Stamping.

Health and Wellness

With some stories, you really can’t rush things. And it’s often best just to sit back and enjoy the journey for what it is.― Melissa Hill

Bicycles

When we think of summer, we often think about getting the ole bicycle out for a spin. But truly anytime is a good time to go for a bike ride, as long as it isn’t pouring rain or snowing (or extremely hot).  Today we’ll learn a little about the history of bicycles.

One of the first bicycle designs – notice no pedals

The first verifiable claim for a practically used bicycle belongs to German Baron Karl von Drais, a civil servant to the Grand Duke of Baden in Germany. Drais invented his Laufmaschine (German for “running machine”) in 1817, that was called Draisine (English) which was the first commercially successful two-wheeled, steerable, human-propelled machine, commonly called a velocipede, and nicknamed hobby-horse or dandy horse.

Around 1853 the design of the draisine was improved to include pedals. Pedaling made it easier for riders to propel the machine at speed, but the rotational speed limitation of this design created stability and comfort concerns. It was difficult to pedal the wheel that was used for steering.

Pedal chain-driven bicycle

High-bicycle

The high-bicycle was the logical extension of the previous model, the front wheel enlarging to enable higher speeds and the frame being made lighter.

The development of the safety bicycle was arguably the most important change in the history of the bicycle. It shifted their use and public perception from being a dangerous toy for sporting young men to being an everyday transport tool for men and women of all ages. It featured a steerable front wheel that had significant caster, equally sized wheels and a chain drive to the rear wheel.

The chain drive improved comfort and speed, as the drive was transferred to the non-steering rear wheel and allowed for smooth, relaxed and injury free pedaling. With easier pedaling, the rider more easily turned corners.

Bicycles continued to evolve to suit the varied needs of riders. At mid-century there were two predominant bicycle styles for recreational cyclists in North America. Heavyweight cruiser bicycles, preferred by the typical (hobby) cyclist,] featuring balloon tires, pedal-driven “coaster” brakes and only one gear, were popular for their durability, comfort, streamlined appearance, and a significant array of accessories (lights, bells, springer forks, speedometers, etc.). Lighter cycles, with hand brakes, narrower tires, and a three-speed hub gearing system, often imported from England, first became popular in the United States in the late 1950s.

Modern Electric Bicycle

The 21st century has seen a continued application of technology to bicycles (which started in the 20th century): in designing them, building them, and using them. Bicycle frames and components continue to get lighter and aerodynamic without sacrificing strength.

Why not get your bicycle out today and go for a ride?  Please remember to wear a helmet for safety.

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update, June 3, 2020

Welcome

Hatch Team, we hope you are having a great Wednesday, June 3rd!  Thank you for visiting us virtually and we hope to see you soon in person.  Today we have some great trivia — remember not only is trivia good for our brains, but knowing obscure facts is known to be good for our mental health – which leads us to the interesting trivia in the Health and Wellness posting below.

Be well, be safe and continue to check in with us virtually.

Health and Wellness

Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Time for some Trivia!

 

Let’s break up the week with a little trivia.  The questions are a mix of pop culture, science, sports, and a few miscellaneous categories.  How many of the questions below can you answer?

  1. What American musical comedy-drama film based on the Broadway musical of the same name was released in 1982?
  2. Before adopting the euro in 1999, what was the currency of Portugal?
  3. Played in 1967 and 1968, which football team won the first two Super Bowl games?
  4. Created by the Hoover Dam, what is the name largest reservoir in the United States?
  5. In military terms, a “klick” is a distance of how many meters?
  6. What is the most populated city in the world?
  7. The Cantabrian Mountains are one of the main systems of mountain ranges in which country?
  8. Electrum is a naturally occurring alloy of what two metals?
  9. Native to South America, what is the largest living rodent in the world?
  10. Which breed of cat, originating on the Isle of Man, is tailless?
  11. What is the name of the car-sized rover that landed on mars in 2012?
  12. Cherophobia the irrational fear of being what?
  13. Held annually since 1923, what is the world’s oldest active sports car race in endurance racing?
  14. During the March equinox, thousands of visitors flock to the Temple of Kukulcan to see a rare architectural event. Where is this site located?
  15. Which company received a major backlash for changing its traditional recipe in the mid 1980’s?

ANSWERS:

  1. What American musical comedy-drama film based on the Broadway musical of the same name was released in 1982? Answer:  Annie
  2. Before adopting the euro in 1999, what was the currency of Portugal? Answer:  Escudo
  3. Played in 1967 and 1968, which football team won the first two Super Bowl games? Answer:  Green Bay Packers
  4. Created by the Hoover Dam, what is the name largest reservoir in the United States? Answer:  Lake Mead
  5. In military terms, a “klick” is a distance of how many meters? Answer:  1,000 Meters
  6. What is the most populated city in the world? Answer:  Shanghai
  7. The Cantabrian Mountains are one of the main systems of mountain ranges in which country? Answer:  Spain
  8. Electrum is a naturally occurring alloy of what two metals? Answer:  Gold and Silver
  9. Native to South America, what is the largest living rodent in the world? Answer:  Capybara
  10. Which breed of cat, originating on the Isle of Man, is tailless? Answer:  Manx
  11. What is the name of the car-sized rover that landed on mars in 2012? Answer:  Curiosity
  12. Cherophobia the irrational fear of being what? Answer:  Happy
  13. Held annually since 1923, what is the world’s oldest active sports car race in endurance racing? Answer: The 24 hours of Le Mans
  14. During the March equinox, thousands of visitors flock to the Temple of Kukulcan to see a rare architectural event. Where is this site located? Answer: Mexico
  15. Which company received a major backlash for changing its traditional recipe in the mid 1980’s? Answer: Coca Cola

 

Note to Hatch Employees

Please remember to update the Human Resource Team with your current contact information.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.