by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 30, 2020 — THE LAST POSTING FOR THIS SITE

REMINDER:  The Employee Website will no longer be available as of July 1, 2020

When we began with the employee website and started posting on March 24, 2020 we still had snow on the ground in Michigan.  Now here we are with July 4th right around the bend. After fourteen weeks of continuous posting, the time has come to discontinue the employee website.

Today, June 30th  is the last day you will be able to access the site and check out previous posts – use the search feature on the left side of the screen if you have something specific in mind.  On Wednesday, July 1st, you will no longer be able to access the site.  If you have questions, please contact your HR representative.  The contact information is listed below.

The past fourteen weeks have been interesting to say the least.  We have weathered through something most of us thought we would never see happen in our lifetime, and we are stronger because of it.  We have had a lot of fun with the daily postings.  We’ve been able to take virtual tours, learn about eagles, clouds, history and a host of other things.  We’ve worked on arts and crafts and tried new recipes.  So, if you’d like to look up the Disney recipe for Dole Whip (April 27th posting), or re-read the post about Lindbergh and Earhart (May 20th posting), or any other posting you were interested in, you still have the opportunity to do so today.

Enjoy the rest of your summer, and please continue to be safe and diligent in protecting yourself and others from Covid-19.

Contact Information

Corporate and Industrial Drive 

Judi Wooten Corporate: 734-320-3213

Benefits – Lauren Wilson: 734-260-9508

Payroll – Tracy Durant: 734-660-6238

Misc. – Diane Overmyer: 734-476-3706

Howell and Fowlerville

Generalist – Colleen Krueger: 734-330-5835

IT Main Point of Contact for All locations

Steve Rauscher:  734-624-8115

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 29, 2020

Announcement:  The Employee Website will no longer be available as of July 1, 2020

When we began with the employee website and started posting on March 24, 2020 we still had snow on the ground in Michigan.  Now here we are with July 4th right around the bend. After fourteen weeks of continuous posting, the time has come to discontinue the employee website.

Today and tomorrow, June 29th and 30th you will be able to access the site and check out previous posts – use the search feature on the left side of the screen if you have something specific in mind.  On Wednesday, July 1st, you will no longer be able to access the site.  If you have questions, please contact your HR representative.  The contact information is listed below.

The past fourteen weeks have been interesting to say the least.  We have weathered through something most of us thought we would never see happen in our lifetime, and we are stronger because of it.  We have had a lot of fun with the daily postings.  We’ve been able to take virtual tours, learn about eagles, clouds, history and a host of other things.  We’ve worked on arts and crafts and tried new recipes.  So, if you’d like to look up the Disney recipe for Dole Whip (April 27th posting), or re-read the post about Lindbergh and Earhart (May 20th posting), or any other posting you were interested in, you still have the opportunity to do so today and tomorrow.

Enjoy the rest of your summer, and please continue to be safe and diligent in protecting yourself and others from Covid-19.

Contact Information

Corporate and Industrial Drive 

Judi Wooten Corporate: 734-320-3213

Benefits – Lauren Wilson: 734-260-9508

Payroll – Tracy Durant: 734-660-6238

Misc. – Diane Overmyer: 734-476-3706

Howell and Fowlerville

Generalist – Colleen Krueger: 734-330-5835

IT Main Point of Contact for All locations

Steve Rauscher:  734-624-8115

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 26, 2020

Welcome

Today is Friday, June 26, 2020!  Officially past the start of summer and longing for the ability to travel!  We thought you might like a virtual drive via U.S. Route 66.  We recognize that not everyone has been on the journey they want at this time but are sure that you will find this trip down memory lane for some or a new adventure for others interesting!

We continue to anticipate seeing the team together in person again and hope this posting finds you well.  Thank you for continuing to visit us virtually.

Hatch Stamping Company currently has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Remember there are no postings over the weekend, so we will see you on Monday.  Stay well and stay connected!

Health and Wellness

Route 66

U.S. Route 66 or U.S. Highway 66 (US 66 or Route 66), also known as the Will Rogers Highway, the Main Street of America or the Mother Road, was one of the original highways in the U.S. Highway System. US 66 was established on November 11, 1926, with road signs erected the following year. The highway, which became one of the most famous roads in the United States, originally ran from Chicago, Illinois, through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona before ending in Santa Monica in Los Angeles County, California, covering a total of 2,448 miles (3,940 km).

Click on the image for a better view of the map

US 66 served as a primary route for those who migrated west, especially during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and the road supported the economies of the communities through which it passed. People doing business along the route became prosperous due to the growing popularity of the highway, and those same people later fought to keep the highway alive in the face of the growing threat of being bypassed by the new Interstate Highway System.

US 66 underwent many improvements and realignments over its lifetime, but was officially removed from the United States Highway System in 1985 after it had been replaced in its entirety by segments of the Interstate Highway System. Portions of the road that passed through Illinois, Missouri, New Mexico, and Arizona have been communally designated a National Scenic Byway by the name “Historic Route 66”, returning the name to some maps. Several states have adopted significant bypassed sections of the former US 66 into their state road networks as State Route 66. The corridor is also being redeveloped into U.S. Bicycle Route 66, a part of the United States Bicycle Route System that was developed in the 2010s.

Historic US Highway 66 spans the heart of America, symbolizing mobility, freedom, and pursuit of the American Dream. Highly celebrated through literature, film, and song, Route 66 is of national significance as a symbol of America’s transportation history and the impact of the automobile. Perhaps more than any other highway, Route 66 has come to symbolize hope, progress, and the spirit of adventure. In 1985, US Highway 66 was decommissioned as a federal highway, but continues to live on in the American consciousness as “Route 66.”

The National Park Service Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program
In recognition of the significance of Route 66 to America’s heritage, Congress passed an Act in 1999 to create the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program. Administered by the National Park Service, National Trails Intermountain Region, the program preserves the special places and stories of this historic highway. The program collaborates with private, nonprofit, and government partners to identify and prioritize Route 66 preservation needs. The program provides cost-share grants to help preserve the most significant and representative historic sites related to the route’s period of significance (1926-1985). It also assists preservation planning, research, and educational initiatives, and serves as a clearinghouse for preservation information and technical assistance. Since 2001, over 100 projects have received cost-share grant assistance across the route.

Set to legislatively terminate at the end of 2009, the program was reauthorized on March 30, 2009 for an additional 10 years. Under the new authorization, the program will continue to offer grants, technical assistance, clearinghouse functions, and pursue long-term priorities to sustain preservation efforts along Route 66.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 25, 2020

Welcome

Good Day!  Today is Thursday, June 25, 2020 and we hope this posting finds you well.  We continue to support our customer’s ramp up requirements and if you haven’t already please make sure you update your local Human Resource team member with your current contact information.

Today’s Health and Wellness post if full of fun facts of a summer time treat — we hope you enjoy!  The practice of social distancing and personal hygiene remain important and both are part of the day-to-day operations at Hatch Stamping Company.  We hope you are able to practice both and that we will be seeing you in person soon, in the meantime, please continue to visit us virtually.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Be safe and stay connected!

Health and Wellness

The Popsicle

Believe it or not, the mind behind this summer indulgence wasn’t a marketing honcho, or even a chef – it was an 11-year-old boy.  ~Stephanie Butler

Frank Epperson was just a boy in 1905 in Oakland, California, when one night he accidentally left a glass – filled with water, powdered soda mix and a wooden stick for stirring – outside overnight. When young Frank found the glass in the morning, the soda mixture was frozen solid, so he ran the glass under hot water and removed the ice pop using the stick as a handle. Frank knew he had a great idea on his hands, and he kept making the pops for his friends, and when he became an adult he made them for his own children.

In 1923, Epperson filed for a patent for his invention. Up until then, he had been calling the frozen treats “Eppsicles,” but his children insisted on calling them “Pop’s ‘sicles.” The latter name stuck and the Popsicle was born.

The frozen treat was an immediate success. In the early 1920s, an estimated 8,000 Popsicles were sold in one day at Brooklyn’s Coney Island amusement park. The first Popsicles sold for just five cents and came in seven flavors (including cherry, which is still the most popular Popsicle). Just a few years after the dessert debuted, the double-stick Popsicle was introduced. It was at the height of the Depression, and the single pop with two sticks allowed two hungry children to share a pop easily, for the same price as a single.

Popsicle Recipes to Make at Home

Easy Strawberries And Cream Popsicles

1 cup strawberries

1/2 cup vanilla ice cream or yogurt

1 cup of milk

1 Tbsp. sugar

Blend the ingredients until smooth. Pour into molds and freeze.

2 Ingredient Watermelon Popsicles

1 cup watermelon

1 cup orange juice

1 cup water

Blend the ingredients until smooth. Pour into molds and freeze.

Easy Strawberry Banana Popsicles

1 (3 oz.) package strawberry gelatin

1 cup boiling water

1 banana

1 cup yogurt or ice cream. Blend well and pour into molds.

Dissolve gelatin in water. In a blender, mix gelatin mixture, banana and yogurt. Pour into molds and freeze.

Easy 2 Ingredient Blueberries and Cream Popsicles

1 1/2 cups vanilla yogurt

1/2 cup blueberries

Fill each popsicle half way with yogurt. Freeze. Blend blueberries with the rest of the yogurt. After the first half has frozen, fill the molds the rest of the way and freeze.

Easy 3 Ingredient Blueberry/Raspberry Popsicles!

1 1/2 cups vanilla pudding, yogurt OR ice cream

1/4 cup blueberries

1/4 raspberries

Blend everything and then pour into molds and freeze.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 24, 2020

Welcome

Welcome to Wednesday, June 24, 2020.  Can you believe we are halfway through the year and Summer officially started a few days ago!  Please take a moment and enjoy!  All too soon, it will much colder with frigid winds rather than warm breezes!

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Please stay tuned and stay connected.

Health and Wellness

Although the end of June is quickly approaching, we thought it would be interesting to look at some fun facts about June.

The end of June marks the end of the first half of the calendar year, so it’s a time to reflect on the year so far.

Let’s learn some cool facts about JUNE!

  • The name June is the modern day adaption of the Latin word Junius, which has its origins dating back to the ancient Romans.
  • June used to be the fourth month in the year. Before Julius Caesar came to power, the calendar year only had 10 months. In 46 BC he created the Julian calendar by adding two more months to the year, which made June the sixth month.
  • No other month in the year begins on the same day of the week as June.
  • June has both the longest and the shortest days of the year, depending on where you’re standing! If you live in the northern hemisphere, then the 21st of June is the longest day of the year. If you live in the southern hemisphere, then the 21st of June is the shortest day of the year.
  • The first day of summer in the northern hemisphere is on the 21st of June.
  • If you were born in June, then you’re one of two star signs. If you were born on or before the 20th of June then you’re a Gemini. If you were born on or after the 21st of June, you have the Cancer star sign.
  • The birth flowers of June are the honeysuckle and the rose.
  • There are a number of countries that celebrate their flag days during the month of June. Sweden celebrates their flag day on the 6th of June, the United States celebrates theirs on the 14th of June and Denmark celebrates theirs on the 15th of June.
  • If you’re a big fan of tennis, then June is a good month for you! The internationally renowned English tennis tournament Wimbledon runs through the month of June.
  • June has three birthstones – alexandrite, moonstone, and pearl.
  • It’s one of the most wonderful times of the year to get married, but it’s also a time to celebrate either the summer or winter solstice!

Whatever you do, take a moment to reflect on the year so far, as it’s halfway gone already!

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 23, 2020

Welcome

Happy Tuesday, June 23, 2020!

We know many of you feel as though you are running a marathon right now! And, today’s post is very interesting – today is Olympic Day and there is a link so you can participate, check it out!

Thank you for all you are doing!  We know that social distancing as well as keeping families, colleagues and communities safe and sound during these trying times can feel overwhelming.  Thank you!   Your work is paying off!  We continue to miss the personal interaction, but know that virtual visits are safe.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Stay tuned and stay connected!

Health and Wellness

23 June – International Olympic Day

The International Olympic Day is celebrated on 23rd June every year to make people aware of the importance of games in life. Olympic Day is much more than a sports event. It is a day for the world to get active.

What is Olympic Day?

Olympic Day is a celebration of sport, health, and being the best you can be. It invites everyone around the globe to be active.

Participants from all over the world will commemorate the day the International Olympic Committee was founded in 1894.

Olympic Day is developing into much more than a run or just a sports event. Based on the three pillars “move”, “learn” and “discover”, National Olympic Committees are deploying sports, cultural and educational activities which address everybody – regardless age, gender, social background or sporting ability.

Olympians have been a source of inspiration and motivation during these tough times with their energy and positivity: their home workouts have helped us stay moving and their stories have kept us mindful during lockdown.

On 23 June the Olympic Movement will celebrate Olympic Day by creating the world’s largest 24 hour digital-first Olympic workout.

Check out this link https://www.olympic.org/olympic-day for ideas on how to participate from home.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Company Daily Update – June 22, 2020

Welcome

Happy Monday, June 22, 2020!

Welcome to the Hatch Stamping Employee web page!  We hope that you had a great weekend and are rested.  Today, is World Rainforest Day and the posting is full of amazing information.  We continue to support our customers and suppliers in their ramp up process.  Please make sure Human Resources has your contact information. Thank you for visiting us virtually, we want you to know how much we appreciate your interest in not only the postings but the company.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Health and Wellness

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

WORLD RAINFOREST DAY

June 22 is World Rainforest Day. The day has been set aside to help protect rainforests by raising awareness and encouraging action to protect them.

Organizers of this annual day say 20% of the oxygen we breathe and the freshwater we drink is attributed to rainforests of the Amazon. They absorb carbon dioxide, stabilize climate patterns, and are home to half the world’s plant and animal species. The concern of organizers is that an area the size of 40 football fields is lost every minute of every day.

Types of Rainforests

There are two types of rainforests — tropical and temperate. Tropical and temperate rainforests share certain characteristics. For example, most trees flare at the base. Vegetation is dense, tall and very green. Both types of rainforests are rich in plant and animal species, although the diversity is greater in the tropical rainforest.

Both tropical and temperate rainforests are very lush and wet. Rainfall falls regularly throughout the year. The tropical rainforest receives 80-400 inches of rainfall per year. It rains a lot in the temperate rainforest, too — about 100 inches per year. And even more moisture comes from the coastal fog that hovers among the trees.

Tropical rainforests are warm and moist; while temperate rainforests are cool.

Only a small percentage of the tropical forests are rainforests. To be a tropical rainforest, forested areas must:

Lie between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn.

Receive rainfall regularly throughout the year (80-400 inches per year).

Remain warm and frost free all year long (mean temperatures are between 70° and 85°F) with very little daily fluctuation.

Consequently, many forested areas in the tropics are not rainforests.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 19, 2020

Welcome

Happy Friday, June 19th!  We hope this Friday finds you well!  Remember we do not post over the weekend.  We will be back on Monday!  We can never say enough how much we appreciate you staying connected not only by visiting this page, but with the team overall.

Check out today’s post on the Querétaro Aqueduct – what an amazing structure!

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Health and Wellness

The Querétaro Aqueduct

The aqueduct was built in the beginning of the 17th century by the Marquis del Villa del Aguila. At the time he was the richest man in Querétaro.

One of the city’s most serious problems was supplying water to its residence. The Marquis heeded the requests for a supply of clean water for the growing city.

The Marquis provided funds for a long aqueduct to bring in spring water from the ancient settlement of La Cañada, some nine kilometers away, personally supervising the construction and even laying stones with his own hands.

Although the first section of the channel traveled underground, the final length of the waterway ran atop a long arcade that stretched almost five kilometers down into the valley where the city lay. The aqueduct terminated at La Caja de Agua, a cistern near the hillside monastery of Santa Cruz, which released water under pressure to a dozen public fountains and some 60 private ones in the city.

Recently restored to pristine condition, the elevated structure is of Roman dimensions, comprising some 74 arches, some as high as 30 meters. Although it no longer carries municipal water, the colonial aqueduct is­ one of the most ambitious hydraulic projects of the colonial era in Mexico. It is an imposing sight as it sweeps into the city from the surrounding hills.

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update – June 18, 2020

Welcome!

Today is June 18, 2020.  Even though many of us are already experiencing extremely warm and beautiful weather – we still as of this writing have  1 day 15 hours and 34 minutes left until summer officially begins!  We hope this posting finds you enjoying the great summer-like weather and you are able to enjoy the great outdoors.  Check out today’s Health and Wellness post and we hope you are not afraid of heights!  The Grand Canyon is a magnificent site and the skywalk is an incredible structure.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported corona virus cases.

Be well, stay safe and stay connected!

Health and Wellness

It may look like it defies gravity, but the Grand Canyon Skywalk adheres to all the laws of physics and supports the weight of hundreds of thousands of visitors each year!

When David Jin, a Las Vegas businessperson, visited the Grand Canyon in 1996 and looked out over the Rim, he was struck by a flash of inspiration. Soon after, he began working with a team of experts from design and engineering firms Lochsa Engineering and MRJ Architects to devise an ingenious cantilever design that would provide unencumbered views of the Grand Canyon with no direct support from underneath.

The Skywalk is supported by eight columns that in turn support box beams that are six feet tall, 32 inches wide, with two inch thick walls. These box beams are anchored 45 feet deep into the red limestone bedrock of the West Rim, which can support a whopping 16,000 pounds of pressure per square inch, to act as the counterweights for the u-shaped glass bridge.

The Skywalk itself is supported by tuned mass dampers that reduce the normal vibrations caused by wind and people. They also help distribute the weight of the bridge.

Construction of the Skywalk began on October 6, 2004, when the Hualapai blessed the site. Drilling began one month later, and would take 18 months to complete. It took an additional four months to weld the 40 foot beams that would be used to create the Skywalk and truck them to the construction site in Arizona. 

The Skywalk was assembled at the Rim and rolled into place using the same rod and plate method the ancient Egyptians are thought to have used to build the great pyramids. The glass panels that make up the Skywalk’s transparent floor were then lifted into place using special manipulators designed to lift the heavy panels – the glass floor weighs over 80,000 lbs! – using large suction cups. Each glass panel can hold up to 800 people at any given time, and there are 46 glass panels!

In the end, it took over four years, $30 million, and hundreds of highly skilled workers to build this truly spectacular engineering marvel. The Skywalk opened in 2007.

 

by Hatch Stamping Hatch Stamping

Hatch Stamping Daily Update June 17, 2020

Welcome

Welcome to Wednesday, June 17th!  We continue our exploration of monuments, many of which are known around the world, the posting today is particularly fascinating knowing the base started purely from nature.

Currently, Hatch Stamping Company has no reported cases of the corona virus.

Thank you for visiting us virtually, be safe and continue to stay connected!

Health and Wellness

Mount Rushmore

Doane Robinson of the South Dakota Historical Society wanted a monument to be built in South Dakota in order to help the economy of the state by attracting tourism. In 1923, he proposed that this monument should be built from the granite cliffs in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Senator Peter Norbeck of South Dakota approved the proposal, and federal funding helped the project. Robinson asked architect and sculptor Gutzon Borglum. Borglum decided to use Mount Rushmore for the sculpture, since it seemed to be the easiest and most stable of the cliffs to work on.

Having decided on the location of the sculpture, Borglum decided to make the monument of four presidents of the United States. He chose the two most famous presidents in American history, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. He chose Thomas Jefferson because Jefferson nearly doubled the size of the United States in the 1803 Louisiana Purchase (which included the land that became South Dakota). The last president Borglum chose was Theodore Roosevelt, suggested by President Calvin Coolidge (who insisted that at least there be two Republicans and at least one Democrat represented) because of Theodore Roosevelt’s introduction of the National Park Service.

Borglums original design was a sculpture of each president intended to go down to their waists, but time constraints and funding only provided for their heads.

Construction 

Workers used harnesses attached to steel cables while sculpting.

A few hundred workers, most of whom were miners, sculptors, or rock climbers, used dynamite, jackhammers, and chisels to remove material from the mountain. A stairway was constructed to the top of the mountain, where ropes were fixed. Workers were supported by harnesses attached to the ropes.

Construction began on October 4, 1927. In 1935 Borglum appointed Italian immigrant Luigi Del Bianco as chief carver.

Upon completion of presidents sculptures, in 1938, Borglum and his crew began to carve the grand hall, where he envisaged the original Declaration of Independence and United States Constitution should eventually be stored. But a combination of unexpectedly hard granite, looming war in Europe, and lack of funding conspired against Borglum’s last dream, though his plans became more elaborate as his team rushed to complete this work. They had reached 70 feet into the granite by March 1941, when Borglum unexpectedly died. The monument was deemed complete and all work shut down on October 31 of the same year.